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Building and Launching Rockets with Kerbal Space Program – Bob Trembley

September 25 @ 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Virtual Event

Kerbal Space Program (KSP) is a space flight simulation video game that allows you to build rockets, space planes, satellites, landers and rovers. The developers of KSP have partnered with both NASA and the ESA to bring real-life missions and parts into the game.

Bob Trembley is a lifelong amateur astronomer, the 2020 outreach officer for the Warren Astronomical Society, a volunteer NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador, and blogger and factotum for the Vatican Observatory Foundation. Bob is fantastically interested in asteroids and near-Earth objects (NEOs), and a HUGE fan of Kerbal Space Program; he is determined to improve the teaching of astronomy and Space History throughout Michigan, and the U.S.

Bob Trembley believes the educational potential of Kerbal Space Program is astounding, and has logged over 4000 hours in KSP on Steam! For several years, Bob an his wife ran an after-school club where students loved running KSP, and Bob has taught classes in KSP at StarbaseOne at Selfridge Air National Guard base.

Follow Bob on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AstroBalrog
Follow Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BalrogsLair
Read Bob’s Blog: Bob writes a weekly “In the Sky” post on the Sacred Space Astronomy site – the Blog of the Vatican Observatory Foundation: https://www.vofoundation.org/blog/author/rjt/

Bob recently passed 4000 hours in Kerbal Space Program on Steam.

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Bob Trembley talks about Kerbal Space Program on Astronomy for Everyone

Some of Bob Trembley’s KSP Video Suggestions

It’s hard to believe this is even possible in stock KSP – with no mods!

Got an hour and a half? This video is a wonderful mix of live Apollo 8 footage, and maneuver recreations done in KSP – synced with actual command module audio! It’s very cool to be able to “see” the spacecraft performing maneuvers when it is behind the Moon, and out of line-of-sight contact with mission control.

Share via Social Media! Use #AstronomyattheBeach

Organizer

GLAAC
Email:
glaac-board@umich.edu

Venue

Online

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