The Great Lakes Association of Astronomy Clubs (or GLAAC for short) is a loose association of amateur astronomy clubs and educational institutions in Southeastern Michigan who have banded together to provide enjoyable, family-oriented activities that focus on astronomy and space sciences.

Our primary aim is to have fun by learning about astronomy and space sciences, educating others through talks and star parties, and sharing our knowledge and skills with others who share our interest like local schools, scouts, and other organizations.

Michigan Science Center

Wayne State Physics and Astronomy Department
Cranbrook Institute of Science

  • 2018 Events

    September 14th and 15th, 2018
    Astronomy at the Beach, 6PM-12AM
    Kent Lake beach in the Island Lake State Recreation Area.

  • Latest

    I’d ask if anyone saw the eclipse this morning, but this is SE Michigan ☁️☁️☁️

    So, does anyone have a favorite eclipse picture they’d like to share?
    ... See MoreSee Less

     

    Comment on Facebook

    Mine from September 2015 one ... sorry too cloudy this morning

    Brian Ottum of the Lowbrows used his remote New Mexico system to capture the eclipse. www.facebook.com/UniversityLowbrowAstronomers/

    View from towards the ecliptical North Pole. Earth, Moon, and distance between drawn to scale. Arc segment through Moon shows size of Earth's umbra at this distance. If this arc meets the node where the moon crosses the ecliptic, there is an eclipse.

    1 month ago

    Great Lakes Association of Astronomy Clubs

    So who is checking their back yard this morning?Update on the Michigan fireball - this image shows the trajectory of the meteor as determined by the eyewitness accounts posted on the American Meteor Society Website. Our analysis yields a similar result, and we have calculated that this was a very slow moving meteor - speed of about 28,000 miles per hour. This fact, combined with the brightness of the meteor (which suggests a fairly big space rock at least a yard across), shows that the object penetrated deep into the atmosphere before it broke apart (which produced the sounds heard by many observers). It is likely that there are meteorites on the ground near this region - one of our colleagues at JSC has found a Doppler weather radar signature characteristic of meteoritic material falling to earth.

    Pieces of an asteroid lying near Detroit? Let's see what the meteorite hunters find.
    ... See MoreSee Less

    So who is checking their back yard this morning?

     

    Comment on Facebook

    Pete was taking the trash containers to the curb and saw it in Wixom and heard the boom a couple minutes after coming inside.

    This is my guess of the meteor's strewn field.

    $1m for a pound of it they’re guessing!

    Jennifer Cruthirds send those boys out in the backyard!

    Rhonda

    Debi Keeling

    + View previous comments

    3 months ago

    Great Lakes Association of Astronomy Clubs

    Astronomy at the Beach is a two-night annual event bringing together amateur and professional astronomers and science educators to share our love of space and astronomy with the public.

    On both Friday and Saturday nights, from 6 PM until midnight, we'll dazzle your eyes with views of the Moon, Saturn, and more, and expand your mind with presentations about many aspects of popular astronomy.

    Please note that this year we are at Kent Lake Beach in the Island Lake State Recreation area. (Up until last year, we met across the highway at Kensington Metropark.) For most metro Detroiters, it will be a shorter drive! Simply go south on Kensington Road from I-96, then make a left on Kent Lake Beach Road almost as soon as you enter the park. (Google Maps calls the site "Island Lake Picnic Grounds".)

    Learn more: www.glaac.org/astronomy-at-the-beach/

    Astronomy at the Beach 2018Sep 14, 6:00pmIsland Lake Recreation AreaAstronomy at the Beach is a two-night annual event bringing together amateur and professional astronomers and science educators to share our love of space and astronomy with the public.

    On both Friday and Saturday nights, from 6 PM until midnight, we'll dazzle your eyes with views of the Moon, Saturn, and more, and expand your mind with presentations about many aspects of popular astronomy.

    Please note that this year we are at Kent Lake Beach in the Island Lake State Recreation area. (Up until last year, we met across the highway at Kensington Metropark.) For most metro Detroiters, it will be a shorter drive! Simply go south on Kensington Road from I-96, then make a left on Kent Lake Beach Road almost as soon as you enter the park. (Google Maps calls the site "Island Lake Picnic Grounds".)

    Learn more: www.glaac.org/astronomy-at-the-beach/
    ... See MoreSee Less

    Astronomy at the Beach 2018